SOME OF MY FAVORITE COOKBOOK AUTHORS, PART 5

SOME OF MY FAVORITE COOKBOOK AUTHORS PART 5 (Master Chef Louis P. De Gouy, COOKBOOK AUTHOR BERNARD CLAYTON)

TRACING THE LIFE OF MASTER CHEF LOUIS P. DE GOUY

Originally posted on April 2, 2011

“Mr. De Gouy has the gift of making cooking an adventure. Even the plainest dishes become exciting; and for those of bolder spirit, there are many roads opening to new and unexpected gustatory pleasures. He writes with infectious enthusiasm for his subject, salting the book with anecdotes and amusing tales on the origin and the history of philosophy and poetry about the timeless art of cooking and eating” – From the dust jacket of The Gold Cookbook, thirteenth printing, 1960.

“From time immemorial, soups and broths have been the worldwide medium for utilizing what we call the kitchen byproducts or as the French call them, the ‘dessertes de la table’ (leftovers), or ‘les parties interieures de la bete’, such as head, tail, lights, liver, knuckles and feet.” Louis P. De Gouy, The Soup Book (1949).

“Even today, some Dutch mothers place a piece of stale bread in their babies’ cradles to ward off disease. In Morocco, stale bread is considered an excellent cure for stuttering and present-day Egyptians believe that licking a stale crust will cure indigestion” from Breads Superstitions, Louis P. De Gouy The Bread Tray, Dover Publishing, 1974

“Be not deceived by the apparent nonchalance with which an expert cook or master chef throws together an attractive and tempting meal. It is merely proof that, through practical experience, she or he knows thoroughly all the steps and preparation that seem to follow each other so automatically to a successful conclusion. No beginner should feel ashamed to depend on whatever help other people can give, either through printed recipes or by personal instruction” –Louis P. De Gouy from Creative Hamburger Cookery, Dover

Publishing, 1974

“Good soup is one of the prime ingredients of good living. For soup can do more to lift the spirits and stimulate the appetite than any other one dish.”

Louis P. De Gouy, The Soup Book, Dover Publishing, 1974
“One whiff of a savory aromatic soup and appetites come to attention. The steaming fragrance of a tempting soup is a prelude to the goodness to come. An inspired soup puts family and guests in a receptive mood for enjoying the rest of the menu.” Louis P. De Gouy, The Soup Book, Dover Publishing, 1974

And

“There is nothing like a plate or a bowl of hot soup, its wisp of aromatic steam making the nostrils quiver with anticipation, to dispel the depressing effects of a grueling day at the office or the shop, rain or snow in the streets, or bad news in the papers.” – Louis P. De Gouy The Soup Book, Dover Publishing, 1974.

Until relatively recently, I had never heard of Louis De Gouy, and I didn’t have any of his cookbooks. Now I have one, The Gold Cookbook, and I have no idea where it came from–which, I am abashed to admit, is not unusual for me. I have acquired cookbooks singly and by the boxful…recently by the tote-bagful when my daughter in law and I went to the Lancaster Friends of the Library book sale.

When two of my girlfriends died, five years apart, I was given most of their cookbooks. Mandy and I frequently bought the same cookbook at the same time, so now I had two of many different cookbooks.

As I was researching various other cookbook authors, I began coming across references to Louis De Gouy. Most surprising, I discovered that he was one of the founders of the now-defunct Gourmet Magazine which I loved and subscribed to for many years. (*When my husband and I moved to Florida in 1979, I discarded decades of old Gourmet magazines, never imagining they might be valuable). When we returned to California in 1982, I started up a new collection of Gourmet Magazines. Gourmet Magazine debuted in January, 1941 and the final issue was published in November, 2009.

Gourmet Magazine was the idea of Earle R. MacAusland (1891-1980). He conceived the magazine in his mind in the late 1930s and began putting the pieces for it together. He approached Boston artist, Samuel Chamberlain, who agreed to be an out-of-house resource. Chamberlain was useful because he could both illustrate, and write well. MacAusland also recruited a professional chef, Louis Pullig de Gouy. Pearl Metzelthin was the first editor-in-chief.

The first issue appeared in December 1940 (dated January 1941). MacAusland was 50 years old at the time. That first issue was a mere 48 pages, with an illustration of a roasted boar’s head on its cover. The main piece was on the food and wine of Burgundy. In fact, the early years of the magazine would focus on French cooking as well as eastern American food.

In 1941, Clementine Paddleford came onboard as a regular contributor (Clementine Paddleford is one of the cookbook authors on my to-do list to write about). The “You Asked for It” column of recipes requested by readers started in 1944. The magazine started running serial narrative articles that became popular with readers. The covers were often created by Henry Stahlhut.

I learned that De Gouy was the Chef at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel for 30 years but curiously, despite spending three decades at one hotel, he served at numerous other establishments, both here and abroad.

De Gouy began his career as chef under his famous father, who was then Esquire of Cuisine to the late Emperor Francis Josef of Austria. Later he studied under the renowned Escoffier. In time his name became associated with some of the great culinary establishments in Europe and America. In France: Grand Hotel, Hotel Regina, Hotel du Louvre, Hotel de Paris, and Monte Carlo. In England: Carlton Hotel, Leicester Square, Hotel Kensington, and Grand Hotel, Folkstone. in Spain: Casino of San Sebastian and Hotel Maria Christina. In America: the old Hotel Belmont and the old Waldorf-Astoria in New York City; Old Indian Harbor Yacht Club in Greenwich, Conn.; La Tour d’Argent in Chicago; and countless others. He served as Chef Steward aboard the J. P. Morgan yacht Wild Duck when it made its cruise around the world. (For a man who only lived to be seventy-one years old, he really got around).

In addition to being one of the founders of Gourmet Magazine, De Gouy was consulting editor and chef for Restaurant Management Magazine, and consulting chef for the National Hotelmen Association of America.

And if that were not enough, Chef De Gouy authored sixteen cookbooks! How was that accomplished? Well, I can do the math—many of them were published after De Gouy had passed away but it appears that he had compiled the manuscripts and obtained copyrights on them. It would be interesting to know who inherited his works and managed to put them into a respectable collection of cookbooks. And perhaps this also explains the huge value placed on SODA FOUNTAIN/LUNCHEONATTE/DRINKS AND RECIPES published in 1940. There is one listed on Amazon.com and the price is $5,000.00! (I don’t want ANY book that much, to pay such an exorbitant price for it! It’s not like you’re talking about the Gutenberg Bible! And I can’t help but think how many cookbooks I could buy with five thousand dollars!)

The following is a list of De Gouy’s cookbooks with an effort made to putting them in their original date order. I have spent hours searching for additional information but for the most part, come up empty-handed.

• The Derrydale Fish AND GAME Cook Book 1930s (** see footnotes)

• Ice Cream and Ice Cream Desserts: 470 Tested Recipes, original copyright 1938, Copyright renewed 1966

• Sandwich Manual For Professionals, 1939, Published by The Dahls in Stamford Ct.

• Soda Fountain & Luncheonette Drinks & Recipes, 1940, Published by The Dahls in Stamford, Ct.
• The Bread Tray: Recipes for Homemade Breads, Rolls, Muffins and Biscuits, Original copyright 1944, Copyright renewed 1972

• The Gold Cook Book, originally published 1947, with numerous reprints, up to and including 1960, Published by The Chilton Company-Book Division

• The Soup Book, Copyright 1949 by Mrs. Louis De Gouy, Dover Edition 1974

• The Salad Book, 1950
• Creative Hamburger Cookery; 182 Unusual Recipes for Casseroles, Meat… 1951
• The Pie Book, 1974 Dover Publishing

• The Oyster Book

• Sandwich exotica: The sandwich manual for connoisseurs

• The Ultimate Sandwich Book: With Over 700 Delicious Sandwich Creations

• The Cocktail Hour, copyright 1951 by Mrs. LDG, Greenberg Publishing

• Chef’s cook book of profitable recipes; 1500 recipes for hotels

• The Burger Book; tasty ways to serve ground meat

**I am listing the Derrydale Fish & Game Cookbooks as a single entry even though I have seen dozens of listings showing them separately – either the fish or the game cookbook which confused me, initially, because the listing would be something like “Derrydale Fish Cookbook” accompanied by a photo of the cookbook showing illustrating it as “Derrydale Fish AND Game Cookbook”. I finally found the following which I think clarifies the listing:
“In 1927 Eugine Connell III established the Derrydale Press, the leading publisher of outdoor and sporting books in America. Its original 169 published titles are prized by book collectors around the world. Louis De Gouy was a master chef with possible lineage to a chef of the Austrian Royal Court. Louis was also one of the original founders of Gourmet Makes which made its debut in 1941. This set of wonderful cookbooks was first published in 1937. These are a set of the 1987 reprints and were a limited edition of 3000. This two volume set is a classic in culinary literature. Written in encyclopedic form they are guides to cooking every type of game, fish and crustaceans imaginable. From bear to woodcock and bass to whiting you will never be at a loss for something new and unusual again. These hard bound leather editions are filled with 634 pages of recipes in mint unused condition. They are the perfect gift for the hunter, fisherman or culinary genius in our life.”

Postscript: I have begun collecting the cookbooks of Louis De Gouy, searching for any kind of copies, to read, not necessarily for cookbook collecting value. Out of five that I recently purchased from Alibris.com, four were published by Dover Publishing, and one by Running Press. A clue was found almost immediately by opening the pages of The Bread Tray. Inside is this:

This Book is fondly Dedicated

To the Memory Of
Louis P. De Gouy
(1876-1947)
By His Daughter
Jacqueline S. Dooner

The original copyright for The Bread Tray was obtained by Chef De Gouy in 1944 and renewed in 1972 by his daughter. Curiously, the copyright for De Gouy’s “Creative Hamburger Cookery” was obtained by MRS. Louis P. De Gouy in 1951. This, too, contains the same dedication to De Gouy’s memory by his daughter, Jacqueline.

“Ice Cream and Ice Cream Desserts” is listed by L.P. De Gouy, who seemed to favor changing his name around from time to time. (Did he, perhaps, think that using his own Louis P. De Gouy name on all of his books might flood the market? The original copyright on “Ice Cream and Ice Cream Desserts” is 1938 by L.P. De Gouy and the copyright was renewed by his wife in 1966. It seems fair to assume that Louis P. De Gouy obtained copyrights on all of his original manuscripts whether published or not, and those copyrights were renewed by his heirs.

Not much can be found on the internet that I haven’t already shared with you. Louis P. De Gouy was only 71 years old when he passed away (I can say “only” because I am now 70, approaching 71). And yet he accomplished so much in his lifetime!

I am looking forward to reading his cookbooks. You might want to read them too. These are all “from scratch” cookbooks and I doubt you will find a can of mushroom soup or a box of onion soup mix anywhere in the lot. For those interested, the best prices I’ve found to date were on Alibris. Com.

Happy Cooking – and Happy Cookbook Collecting! Sandra Lee Smith

AMERICA SAYS GOODBYE TO BERNARD CLAYTON, JR.
Originally posted April 8, 2011

The New York Times reported the death March 28, 2011, of Bernard Clayton Jr., who passed away in Bloomington, Indiana. He was 94.

Before bread machines (and you know what I think of those) we had chefs like James Beard and Bernard Clayton Jr teaching us the art of baking breads the traditional way. I would add to that Elizabeth David’s “English Bread and Yeast Cookery” and “The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book” but unquestionably, Beard and Clayton were at the top of the list. Clayton’s detailed dependable recipes guided novices and experts alike through the nuances of baking good bread and making many other dishes.

Everyone knows who James Beard was but you may not be quite as familiar with the name of Bernard Clayton, Jr. He was a native of Indiana, a journalist and a foreign correspondent, and you may not be aware that he was also the author of at least eight cookbooks.

Bernard Clayton was a senior editor and writer for Indiana’s University News Bureau. He was formerly the Time-Life Bureau chief in San Francisco and war correspondent for the magazines during World War II. Later, he was vice president and director of public relations for two major San Francisco firms.

Clayton began his career as a journalist and foreign
correspondent but began writing cookbooks nearly 45 years ago. (You may think it quite a jump from journalist/foreign correspondent to cookbook author but I can think of at least one other person who did the very same thing; Betty Wason. And, coincidentally, Betty Wason was also born in Indiana and grew up there).

Clayton is, perhaps, best known for his cookbooks on breads and I have to confess, I don’t have any of them in my collection –yet. I do have two of Clayton’s books, “The Complete Book of Soups and Stews”, – and, one of my favorite’s “Cooking Across America”. I am partial to all cookbooks with “America” in the title and have amassed quite a collection of them. These are the closest you can get to understanding and appreciating true regional America, which is disappearing fast as we become more and more homogenized.
Clayton’s first cookbook was “The Complete Book of Breads”. This cookbook won the coveted Tastemaker cookbook award and was praised by Craig Claiborne as perhaps the best book on the subject in the English language. Clayton’s Complete Book of Pastry also won the Tastemaker cookbook award.

Clayton experienced a bread-baking epiphany while bicycling across Europe with his wife in 1965. The quality of the breads, gratifying to appetites sharpened by a hard day’s ride, impressed him. Although he had never baked so much as a muffin in his life, he embarked on a quest to explore bread and pastry making. His hobby developed into an obsession, then a career. Over the next decade, he traveled around the world and logged countless hours in his home kitchen, newly outfitted with a professional oven, mastering the techniques and the recipes that he presented in “The Complete Book of Breads.”

Clayton is also the author of “The Breads of France” and “Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Bread”. A 7,000-mile research trip that took him to bakeries all over France led to “The Breads of France” (1978), a comprehensive cookbook that guided the reader through French bread in all forms, from the leaf-shaped fougasse of Provence to the bagels served at Goldenberg’s deli in the Marais neighborhood of Paris.

“The Complete Book of Pastry,” published in 1981, dealt with its subject on a truly global scale, with recipes for strudel, South American empanadas, Italian pizzas and calzones, Greek baklava and Russian piroshki.

It was during his travels all around the world that Clayton collected recipes and put together a collection of 250 soup and 50 stew recipes for his cookbook “The Completed Book of Soups and Stews” published in 1984 by Simon & Shuster. I was charmed by his comment “Cookbook authors, like cooks, collect cookbooks…” Clayton wrote that he surrounded himself with several hundred volumes and their places on the shelves around the room are so familiar to him that he could reach for them in the dark. He lists, in The Complete Book of Soups and Stews, nearly twenty five of his favorite cookbook authors and their cookbook titles that were especially meaningful to him. A few names are not so familiar to me while others are—James Beard and Diana Kennedy, Mollie Katzen and Irma Romauer. One author I was surprised to find on his list was Ann Seranne for her editing of the Southern Junior League Cookbook. I knew who Ann Seranne was but I can’t say I’ve seen her name anywhere else recently. Then, too, this cookbook was published in 1984. He also listed some of his favorite reference volumes which included Larousse Gastronomique and The Escoffier Cook Book.

This was something I could truly relate to, as my two desks and the floor near my computer—along with several bookcases of reference material –are all within reach…periodically, I go on a rampage to put the books back on their respective shelves but before long I am surrounded by stacks of cookbooks again.

In “Cooking Across America” Bernard Clayton and his wife, Marje, decided to take to the road in search of North America’s best cookbooks. He posted this note on the wall above his typewriter: “This will be more than a book of recipes. I am as interested in the cook as a person as I am in the thorough step-by-step presentation of the recipe. I believe these together have been the principal reasons readers have found pleasure in reading and cooking with my books”.

So, for three years, this sentiment defined Bernard & Marje’s days. They drove a GMC van and set out on the odyssey of a life time, what the author often called a dream assignment.

In the beginning, Clayton thought the project would be difficult but he found that every community is as proud of its good cooks as they are of the town band or the high school basketball team. They met over 100 of North America’s best cooks and collected 250 of their favorite recipes.

I like “Cooking Across America” for the same reason I am so fond of the Browns’ “America Cooks” – these are authentic regional collections of recipes that help define what American regional cookery is all about. And, “Cooking Across America” is as much a cook’s travelogue as it is a cookbook.

The following is a list of Bernard Clayton Junior’s cookbooks along with some sources for locating his books for your collection:

The Complete Book of Breads, Alibris.com $8.00

The Breads of France and how to Bake them in your own kitchen 1978, Bernard Clayton & Patricia Wells, Amazon pre-owned starting at $25.00

The Complete Book of Pastry, 1984, Amazon pre-owned starting at $3.00

The Complete Book of Soups and Stews, 1984, Amazon new and used from 1 cent., Alibris.com $4.00

The New Complete Book of Breads, Soups, and Stews 2008, Amazon new $14.98, used $9.99 and up.

The Complete Book of Pastry Sweet & Savory, 1984, Alibris, pre-owned $8.95, Amazon starting at 4 cents, pre owned.

Cooking Across America, 1993 Amazon new from $5.99, pre-owned starting at 59 cents

The Complete Book of Small Breads, 2006, Amazon new from $12.34, pre owned starting 9.20.

I hesitated to list the higher prices; you can discover these for yourself on any of the cookbook websites. I generally consult Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Alibris, and Jessica’s Biscuit.

Do you suppose that Bernard Clayton Jr is now teaching the angels in heaven how to make angel’s biscuits? (Recipe is on pages 32-33 of Cooking Across America).

–Review by Sandra Lee Smith
Happy Cooking & Happy Cookbook Collecting!

***

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2 responses to “SOME OF MY FAVORITE COOKBOOK AUTHORS, PART 5

  1. Sadly, Jessica’s Biscuit closed in November 2014…….Jay

    P.s. I love your posts, and am as dotty as you re cookbooks!

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  2. Thank you for writing – for letting me know about Jessica’s Biscuit and also for your p.s. COMMENTS. The only way I can know if I am getting a response to anything I’ve written…is when people like you make comments. It’s a shame that Jessica’s Biscuit has fallen by the wayside In much the same way as used book stores. I’ve written about this before—as I watched all my favorite used bookstores tumble down one after another. (I think some of them are treading water by selling pre-owned books via Amazon or Alibris or similar venues–for, as long as there are people like myself who still want to hold the actual book(s) in my hands, there will be a market for real books. – Sandy@sandychatter

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