THE SACAGAWEA COOKBOOK

There are cookbooks to suit every occasion and many that most people would never think of – such is the SACAGAWEA COOKBOOK, by Teri Evenson, Lauren Lesmeister and Jeff Evemson, and featuring contemporary recipes.

Well, the first couple times I flew to South Dakota to visit my grandson in Pierre, SD, I was really surprised to discover how seriously South Dakotans take their pioneer history. My son Steve and I visited a wonderful pioneer museum and we took a long drive along the Lewis & Clark trail. We also drove the four hour trip to Rapid City to see the wondrous Mount Rushmore – which also has a fascinating museum.

My copy of the Sacagawea Cookbook was signed by all three authors and features photos and comments about Meriweather Lewis and William Clark.

It’s hard to imagine that their two-year journey across country took place over two hundred years ago. In the Introduction, the authors write, “We write this book in the spirit of remembrance and gratitude for a woman called by many names, claimed by many tribes, and the inspiration for many stories. We have incorporated some of the same plants, roots and meats that were available to her into contemporary recipes. We combed the journals of the Corps of Discovery for references to Sacagawea and placed them throughout this book. The art depicts scenes of the Corps’ journey as well as scenes from Indian life as it was likely to have been so long ago….”

They also write “Sacagawea teaches us to make the very best of our situations. As a tribute to this heroic woman, we have compiled this collection of recipes with many familiar flavors, yet as diverse as the tribes the Corps of Discovery met along the way. We did not restrict our recipes to the ingredients and methods Sacagawea would have used but embellished them with today’s flavors and styles…”

Poetically, they add, “Sacagawea walks through the mists of time, babe on back, pointing to a familiar landmark. She beckons us to retrace her steps and witness some of the sights and tastes that she experienced along the way.

Under the SOUPS category, Meriweather Lewis writes “11th February, 1805, About five o clock this evening, one of the wives of Chabono was delivered of a fine boy. It is worthy to remark that this was the first child which this woman had boarn and as is common in such cases, her labor was tedious and the pain violent…” the baby boy born to Sacagawea was nicknamed “Pomp” by William Clark.

Under the soup category you will find Buffalo Cheese Burger Soup (sounds wonderful!) and Charbonneau’s Onion Soup which is similar to my recipe for onion soup—but I think I will make THIS recipe next time I am craving onion soup. There are also recipes for old Fashioned Vegetable Soup and Old Mandan Bean Soup.

From the journal of William Clark, he writes “20th August, 1806 I ascended to the high country and from an eminence, I had a view of the plains for a great distance from this eminence I had a view of a great number of buffalo than I had ever seen before at one time. I must have seen near 20,000 of those animals feeding on this plain. I have observed that in the country between the nations which are at war with each other the greatest number of wild animals are to be found….” (hard to imagine that white men almost wiped out the buffalo that was so plentiful two hundred years ago).

There are so many historical comments and so many recipes – my best suggestion is to find a copy of The Sacagawea Cookbook” for yourself. I am salivating over Tree Stick Jerky, Hazelnut Mushroom Pate, and an Oatmeal Cookie recipe that I think I will try today. I think I will make a batch of Grandpa’s Apple Butter as well.

I checked with Amazon.com and you can buy The Sacagawea Cookbook starting at 12 cents new or used with many available copies. Remember that pre-owned copies from private vendors will also cost you $3.99 for shipping/handling. Well worth the price! And, as an added bonus, Amazon.com has a lot of other books about Sacagawea that you might want to check out.

–Review by Sandra Lee Smith

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