SINGLE TOPIC COOKBOOKS PART 2

If I had done a little more searching through my bookshelves, I would have discovered quite a few more books on subjects already mentioned in Part One—and I think I will have to do one topic entirely on tomatoes; I have been collecting tomato cookbooks for quite some time (and love to can tomatoes and make my own salsa).

I came across FOUR more lemon cookbooks on my shelves. First is a lovely little book called “LEMONS! LEMONS! LEMONS” by Sarah Schulte and LaLitte. Sarah is a full-time artist. Lalitte is a professional calligrapher who is interested in horticulture. Both women live in NYC, enjoy cooking and love lemons.

There are all kinds of recipes using lemons, ranging from Guacamole (which I wouldn’t attempt without having lemons on hand) to a recipe for lemon marmalade, that I think I would like to try.

While I didn’t find “LEMONS! LEMONS! LEMONS” on Amazon.com—I was nonplussed to see how many other kinds of books are available –not just cookbooks but mysteries and (I hate to admit it) lemon cookbooks that I don’t have. Just to be thorough, I checked on Alibris.com and DID find “LEMONS! LEMONS! LEMONS” starting at $4.00.

Another little cookbook – this time shaped like a lemon, is small enough to be overlooked. “TOTALLY LEMON COOKBOOK” by Helene Siegel and Karen Gillingham was published by Celestial Arts in Berkeley, California in 1999. This is a winner – it contains my favorite recipe for Lemon Chicken, Lemon Curd, (which I love making) and Preserved Lemons—which I made one time when I was living in Arleta and we had three lemon trees. There is a recipe for Lemonade Wafers that I think I will have to make soon.

Alibris.com has “TOTALLY LEMON COOKBOOK” for 99 cents. Amazon.com has the book pre-owned starting at $1.49. Do I want to know that the author created another book called “TOTALLY CHEESE COOKBOOK” but the price on that one starts around $20.00, so I won’t be buying that one anytime soon.

Another book on lemons is “LIVELY LEMON RECIPES, for Gourmet and Everyday Dishes”, by Joyce Crumal. This book was published by Howell-North Books in Berkeley, California in 1967. This is a hardcover book with loads of lemon recipes and an in-depth introduction to the history of lemons. I don’t really remember buying “LIVELY LEMON RECIPES” but I think it may have been one of the books I inherited when two of my girlfriends passed away and I was given a lot of their books.

I have one other lemon cookbook from the Country Garden Cookbook series that I believe I received when I was reviewing cookbooks for the Cookbook Collectors Exchange newsletter.

Amazon.com has “LEMONS, A Country Garden Cookbook, by Christopher Idone, and prices start at only one cent for a pre-owned copy. The county garden cookbook series are all the same size, with beautiful illustrations. You really can’t go wrong with any of these lemon cookbooks.

While searching for more one topic cookbooks—and fortunately, all of my fruit and vegetable cookbooks are in the same bookcase—I realized I had more apple cookbooks – and the first one is a small spiral cookbook in the shape of an apple. The title is “THE BIG FAT RED JUICY APPLE COOKBOOK” edited by Judith Bosley and published by Grand Books in Middleton, Michigan. You wont believe how many recipes are in this little book!

Amazon.com has this cookbook for about $5.00 for a new copy and starting at 21 cents for a pre-owned copy.

Favorite Recipes from America’s Orchards is a soft-cover cookbook titled APPLES, APPLES EVERYWHERE by Lee Jackson. On the back cover we read, in part, ‘Outstanding recipes from some of America’s finest orchards, cider mills, and fruit growers are shared in the collection” – the author has collected recipes from various apple places, many which are featured in their restaurants. You will want to try all of these recipes.

APPLES, APPLES EVERYWHERE is on Amazon.com and can be yours, new, for $11.00 or pre-owned starting at one cent. (remember you will pay $3.99 shipping and handling for all pre-owned books that you purchase).

Next is THE APPLE BARN COOKBOOK FROM THE APPLE BARN AND CIDER MILL from Sevierville, Tennessee. This cookbook was published in 1983 and printed by Wimmer Brothers, a famous cookbook publisher—but I noted at the back of the book, order forms. You can write to THE APPLE BARN COOKBOOK at Riverbend Farm, 230 Apple Valley Road, Sevierville, Tenn 37862.

Nevertheless, I checked with Amazon.com and found the same cookbook, a later publication date by Bill Kilpatrick, published in 1998, paperback $4.95, pre-owned starting at one cent.

APPLE CELLAR is a spiral bound cookbook compiled by Ruth Blackett with illustrations by Karen Walker Porter. This has a fairly substantial collection of apple recipes. APPLE CELLAR is featured on Amazon.com, with a price of $7.50 for a new copy—no other copies are listed and it doesn’t provide a picture of the cookbook but since my copy was published in 1981 and so was the one in Amazon, I think it’s a fairly reasonable assumption they are one and the same. There is an apple spice cake featured in the cookbook and someone wrote “good!” alongside it. Since I just finished canning applesauce and the recipe calls for a cup of it, I think I will try this one myself.

Back in the 1970s, Penny, my penpal in Oklahoma, introduced me to Farm Journal cookbooks. We strived to own all of them – they were a cook’s bible. COOKING WITH APPLES by Shirley Munson and Jo Nelson with the Food Editors of Farm Journal produced this small soft cover cookbook which features dessert recipes I haven’t seen elsewhere. At the end of the cookbook a character doll, made by hand by a pioneer mother, is featured. The head of the doll was made with an apple. That’s one I haven’t seen anywhere else.
COOKING WITH APPLES took some deep searching on Amazon.com – I finally found a copy listed at $15.99 for a new copy and $3.32 for a pre-owned one. It was only $2.95 when it was brand new—so you may want to do some more searching depending how much you want a copy.

A larger lovely cookbook titled AN APPLE HARVEST/Recipes and Orchard Lore by Frank Browning & Sharon Silva is a beautiful hardcover cookbook. My copy was published in 1999 by Ten Speed Press and it appears to have been reprinted with a different cover. AN APPLE HARVEST took a bit of searching to find it. Amazon has it for $15.29 for a new copy and pre-owned copies available starting at $3.05.
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There are several berry cookbooks in my collection. One is shaped like a basket of berries. It was compiled by Judith Bosley and published in 1991 in Livonia, Michigan. The book is divided into four categories—take your pick of strawberries, Raspberries, Blueberries or Cranberries. Recipes are mostly easy to do—like Raspberry Cordial—4 ingredients, or Raspberry Liqueur (something I love to make) –another easy to do with 4 ingredients. There is one recipe to a page and with wire spiral binding, it will lay flat on your kitchen counter. I’m in love with Judith’s Blueberry Cream Puff Pie, having made cream puffs not long ago myself.

A VERY BERRY COOKBOOK is not very big in size but it contains 117 recipes. It is available at both Amazon.com and Alibris.com and neither website shows a true depiction of the book, which puzzles me. Amazon.com offers the book for 2.26 new or starting at one cent for pre-owned. Alibris.com offers it for 99c or for $2.26 new. This appears to be part of a “grand cookbook series”—in which the Big Fat Red Juicy Apple Cookbook was featured. Also in the series (but I don’t have any of the other books) is a book about cherries, another about potatoes, another on fish food and one about cheese.

Another berry cookbook is one called BERRY-GOOD RECIPES/Strawberry Patch Cookbook. This appears to be a fund-raising project by Allegan Dollars for Scholars and is a spiral bound cookbook. Strawberries are in season in the high desert where I live, so I am looking forward to trying some different recipes. Generally, I make strawberry jam or strawberry and blueberry jam, my granddaughter’s favorite.

Finally—not to be overlooked—A Country Garden Cookbook titled BERRIES was written by Sharon Kramis with photography by Kathryn Kleinman. The introduction is one of my favorites and there is a color glossary of all the different kinds of berries, which you will surely treasure. I love the recipes but confess I am most partial to recipes for jam, which is a favorite pastime of mine. You will love all the recipes—so, so mouthwatering from beginning to end. And—BERRIES was the first title to pop up when I began a search on Amazon.com. You can own a copy of BERRIES, a Country Garden Cookbook for $1.99 new or starting at one cent for a pre-owned copy. (and while I am on the topic—there are other books in the Country Garden Cookbook series—more about those later!)
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Amongst the cookbooks in my fruit & vegetable files are a few of which I have just one copy. One of these is the SPHINX RANCH DATE RECIPES, compiled by Rick Heetland and published by Golden West Publishers (A publishing company I am familiar with). Sphinx Ranch Date Recipes by Rick Heetland is available on Amazon.com for $8.95 for a new copy, or starting at one cent for a pre-owned copy.

2. THE PRUNE GOURMET compiled by Donna Rodnitzky, Jogail Wenzel and Ellie Densen was published by Chronicle Books in San Francisco. THE PRUNE GOURMET is available on Amazon.com for $5.35 new, or starting at one cent for a pre-owned copy.

3. Marvelous Maple Masteries Cook Book compiled by the American Maple Museum is a New York State Cookbook and is not listed on Amazon.com or Alibris.com. Marvelous Maple Masteries is listed in the introduction located on Main Street, Croghan, Lewis County, New York. This may truly be one of a kind; I couldn’t find it on Amazon, Alibris, or on Google—but I can’t wait for Christmas baking and candy making! There are several pages of maple candy recipes I want to try!

4. THE VIDALIA SWEET ONION LOVERS COOKBOOK by Bland Farms is a spiral bound cookbook which you can order at 1-800-VIDALIA. This appears to have been compiled from recipes submitted by Vidalia customers all over the USA. Vidalia onions have a very short lifespan in your supermarket, if you don’t already know this—a girlfriend from work and I ordered them by the case directly from Bland Farms for several years, sharing the expense. I’ve learned to peel and finely dice the onions and pack them in 1 or 2-cup zip lock bags to freeze. (I have a Vidalia onion chopper that is absolutely dandy in the kitchen, not just for dicing onions (fine dice or larger) but good for so many other vegetables that are easy to chop, like bell peppers. When bell peppers are in season and a good price, I stock up on those and dice them up to go in zip lock bags, as well. I dice red, green, yellow, and orange bell peppers to freeze and have on hand.

This concludes part 2 of Single Topic Cookbooks – but look for part 3, soon as I get myself in gear and start writing it. (I am busy canning right now, too and have developed “sources” here in the desert. A girlfriend’s sister brought me pears and apples, as well as Asian pears; another friend brought me two little buckets of figs; my son has been bringing tomatoes and other vegetables to me—and I may have another source for tomatoes).

A thought crossed my mind as I was preparing this article to put it on my blog–any time I tell you about a cookbook being available on Amazon.com or Alibris.com –if you want to SEE the cookbook, they are almost always illustrated on the websites. I am incapable of downloading/uploading the covers–but you can see them on Amazon or Alibris.

–Sandra Lee Smith

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2 responses to “SINGLE TOPIC COOKBOOKS PART 2

  1. Not a big fan of single topic cookbooks but, as you said, there are so many. A few weeks ago, while shopping I saw one : GRITS. Now that surprised me a bit – but I guess they have become more ‘used in many ways’ the last 10 – 15 years. I know the 1st time I was served them (breakfast in Atlanta in ’54) they looked like a small scoop of weird mashed potatoes with butter in the middle. Not too appeaing.

    • Shirley, the first time I saw grits on my plate (ew) was when we moved to Florida…I think its an acquired taste – when I was visiting my sister in Tennessee over the years, there were a lot of grits on breakfast plates . I never liked them and never got used to them –but I think anything you have to drown in butter to eat…can’t be very good. 🙂 Sandy

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