SOME CANADIAN COMMUNITY COOKBOOKS FROM SHARON’S COLLECTION

Some time ago, I mentioned acquiring some cookbooks that had belonged to my friend Sharon’s mother. Unfortunately, I didn’t mark any of these in any way to differentiate between those of Sharon’s mother and others I acquired when I was in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and Sharon and I visited some used book stores—OR those sent to me by my Michigan penpal, Betsy, who began sending me a lot of Canadian cookbooks when she learned of my interest.

So, other community cookbooks from Canada found their way onto my bookshelves. However, that being said, I think that many of the Canadian community cookbooks originally belonged to Sharon’s mother. Sharon has a few cookbooks that she’s kept—some of whi
ch came from me!

A Sandychatter subscriber expressed interest in these Canadian Community cookbooks and requested a list of the titles, so that she can look for some of these books. My subscriber is a former Canadian now living in the USA but she writes that she & her husband frequently “go home” to Canada to visit friends and relatives. So, Marie, the following is for you. Perhaps having a list of titles will enable you to find more of the books you are interested in. And making frequent trips to Ontario might make finding some of them more accessible. I will ask Sharon if she remembers the name of the used book store we visited on our way to Ft Erie one day when I was in Canada.

The following list is not restricted to Canadian community cookbooks; many of the not-necessarily-community cookbooks have been included because I found them interesting and perhaps while not “community” cookbooks in the strictest sense of the word are regional cookbooks.

PURITY COOK BOOK 875 TEST RECIPES Purity Flour Mills Toronto, 1932 reprinted 1945, hardcover nicely done!

CENTENNIAL COOKBOOK CHURCH OF CHRIST, FENWICK, ONTARIO, CIRCA 1946, spiral bound, photo of church on cover, larger than most cookbooks, more like 8½ x 11” in size. From Sharon’s mother.

FAVOURITE RECIPES BOOK NO. 2, LADY GREY CHAPTER I.O.D.E., Ft. William, Ontario. Blue cover with insignia of Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire 1946. *Sandy’s cooknote: I believe I bought this book in Tulsa, Oklahoma in August 1973. The handwritten date inside the book is in my handwriting!

THE BLACK WHALE COOKBOOK/Fine old recipes from the Gaspe coast. Soft cover booklet compiled by Mrs. Ethel Renouf. Not a community cookbook but interesting collection of old recipes handed down from Mother to Daughter. 1948.

BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC LADIES CLUB, COOKBOK. 1948, soft cover, New Westminster, B.C. Booklet was compiled by the BC Electric’s Home Service Centre staffed by home economists.

THE FLYING SKILLET, RCAF STATION ROCKCLIFFE, sponsored by The Women’s Auxiliary RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, 1954, offset printing handwritten entries, spiral bound. (One of my favorites!)

BRITISH COLUMBIA WOMENS INSTITUTE CENTENNIAL COOKBOOK, 1959

DUTCH OVEN, cookbook of coveted traditional recipes from the kitchens of Lunenburg, spiral bound, 8th edition 1963, offset printing, all contributors handwritten recipes. Another favorite!

BUSTLE TO HUSTLE WOMEN’S AUXILIARY ST JOSEPH HOSPITAL HAMILTON ONTARIO, spiral, soft cover, 1967

THE PLEASURES OF THE TABLE/WOMENS COLLEGE HOSPITAL, TORONTO, 1968 CLIPPING, BOOK UNDATED.

RECIPES FOR YOUNG HOMEMAKERS, MANITOBA HOME EC TEACHERS, 1968

P.B. THE CANADIAN COOKOOK, Mme. Jehane Benoit, 1970

KITCHEN CAPERS, JUNIOR SERVICE LEAGUE OF MANITOWOC COUNTY 1971, spiral bound, soft cover.

FAVORITE RECIPES, KITIMAT LION L’S KITIMAT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, spiral bound, but undated. However, 1973-74 is handwritten on the dedication page.

FAVOURITE RECIPES FROM THE LADIES OF CENTRAL UNITED CHURCH, LUNENBURG, NOVA SCOTIA, 1974, Stapled booklet, recipes all offset printing, oddly printed in blue ink, a few recipes difficult to read but otherwise interesting with recipes accompanied at times with cute little illustrations.

THE EARLY CANADIAN GALT COOKBOOK, Originally published 1898 BY THE LADIES OF GALT compiled and edited by Margaret Taylor and Frances McNaught ; facsimile published by Coles Publishing Toronto 1974 soft cover, bound. Many listings on Google; none explain who “the ladies of Galt” were.

TEMPTING TREATS FROM ONTARIO MAPLE BUSHES, published by Ontario Maple Syrup Producers Association, spiral bound, January 1976

CULINARY TREASUES CENTENNIAL 1867-1967 ST BASIL’S UKRAINIAN WOMEN’S LEAGUE, ALBERTA, REPRINTED 1977

FROM OUR KITCHEN TO YOURS, GOOD NEWS UNITED STAMFORD UNITED CHURCH, NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO, spiral bound, blue cover with picture of the church, undated! However, there is a recipe for hot wings which leads me to think this was a 1970s cookbook.

NEWFOUNDLAND RECIPES from the Kitchens of Newfoundland, soft cover booklet by Carol Over, many printings. Many signed recipes from contributors, definitely a local flavor—Moose Pot Pie and Moose Stew, Fried Cod Tongues, Moose cabbage rolls, something called Bangbelly (a traditional Christmas Eve Dish) – and what are partridgeberries and where can I buy some? 1st printed 1979.

TO SUIT ALL TASTES—A Bicentennial Cookbook Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, Ontario spiral bound 1980.

CANADA COOKS, WIVES OF CANADIAN FOCES PERSONNEL IN THE USA 1981 spiral bound.

COOKING FOR TWO, WINNIPEG DACHSHUND CLUB, 1982. Spiral bound.

UWC GOURMET COLLECTION (University Woman’s Club of St Catharines, 1983, spiral bound.

TASTE NIAGARA, THE PRESERVATIOPN OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS SOCIETY, written & compiled by Garcia Janes, Ontario 1984, spiral bound.

THE LAURA SECORD CANADIAN COOK BOOK, ring binding, Canadian Home Economics Association, 1984

A TASTE OF VANCOUVER, RECIPES FOM THE CHEFS OF CANADA’S WEST COAST, spiral binding, 1985 –not a community cookbook – but interesting!

Manitoulin CENTENNIAL MANOR INTERNATIONAL COOKBOOK AND OLD FAMILY FAVOURITES, 20 YEARS ANNIVERSARY 1987, ring binding

CANADA COOKS! Microwave, spiral bound BY Ann Merling, 1988

THE LIGHTHOUSE COOKBOOK, Anita Stewart, Harbour Publishing, 1988

LET’S BREAK BREAD TOGETHER – UNITED CHURCHES IN CANADA, 1988, ring binding, Manitoba; contributions list churches not individuals.

FAVORITE RECIPES HAY LAKES LADIES CLUB, ALBERTA, plastic ring binding. Undated!

NIAGARA FALLS CURLING CLUB LADIES SECTION casseroles, desserts and Christmas recipes, spiral bound, contains history of Niagara Falls Curling Club dating back to 1887, spiral bound, contains recipe for Harvey Wallbanger Cake (late 70s, early 80s?)

THE TASTE OF SUCCESS, CIBC IN SUPPORT OF CHILDRENS HOSPITAL FOR CHEDOKE-MC MASTER, Wire ring bindings. Undated!

FIVE ROSES “A GUIDE TO GOOD COOKING” from Lake of the Woods Mills, Montreal, 25th edition undated! Soft cover, ring binding. Many recipes!

COOKING COLLAGE OF RODMAN HALL, St. Catharine’s, plastic ring binding, offset printing with individually handwritten recipes. Undated!

EDWARDSBURG RECIPE BOOK, the Canada Starch Co, booklet Montreal small booklet, undated! Looks very old judging by photographs—related to Argo Starch and Mazola oil?

TESTED REIPE USING CANADA’S CANNED FOODS, booklet, Home Economics section, American Can Company, Hamilton Ontario. Undated; photos look like 1950s.

A FAMILY TRADITION, THE MAGIC BAKING PODER COOKBOOK –booklet, Standard brands, undated, photo on cover looks like 1940s or 50s.

ZONTA CLUB, Niagara Falls, Ontario, undated, offset printing (so all recipes are individually written by participants), spiral bound, ads

OUR FAVORITE RECIPES/Dames Auxiliaires Paroisse des Saints-Martyrs Canadiens St Boniface, Manitoba, undated, spiral bound, ads.

“BE PREPARED” Niagara District Scouters Council, spiral bound with green cover, undated.

ST ANTHONY’S HOSPITAL, ESTERHAZY, SASKATCHEWAN 50 YEARS WE CARE, undated, spiral bound.

FAVORITE RECIPES FOR HOME & COUNTRY CALAHOO WOMENS INST. CALAHOOO, ALBERTA, ADS/SPIRAL BOUND, UNDATED

THE BEST IN COOKING IN HARBOUR GRACE, NEWFOUNDLAND, undated/ads

iF you know the publishing dates of the ones marked undated–feel free to write a correction to me!

Happy Cooking and happy cookbook collecting

Sandy

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9 responses to “SOME CANADIAN COMMUNITY COOKBOOKS FROM SHARON’S COLLECTION

  1. ps before anyone writes to correct my spelling, I used word check for spelling not once but twice–argh! – Sandy

  2. Hi Sandy,

    I can’t comment on Canadian cookbooks as such but there is a fantastic bookshop in Amherst (Amhurst?) on the train line from Montreal north – we stopped off there to pick up a car to go to PE Island and found it on the way back – about 1/2 mile from the train station – too much choice! Hope that helps you and others to find it – have lost the bookmark and we couldn’t buy too much as we were shortly flying back to the UK.
    Thanks for you “Chatter” – very enlightening and enjoyable! Sue in UK

  3. Thanks for the information, Sue. I hope Marie sees my post and your comment. Sandy

  4. I didn’t see any COMPANY’S COMING cookbooks by Jean Pare listed. I think I have sent you some. Maybe you didn’t realize they are Canadian.She has written quite a few. You could probably write something on her. They are excellent books. Goggle her. Betsy

  5. Hi, Betsy – I didnt include the books by Jean Pare – will do something on general Canadian cookbooks later on…I was focusing mainly on community cookbooks as that was what one og my subscribers, Marie, requested. I included a couple of others such as the 5 roses flour cookbook and a Purity one – because I felt they were still “regional” which in my mind was interchangeable with “community” when we were really into collecting the spiral bound cookbooks back in the 60s. But you are right, those cookbooks are also a must for anyone’s Canadian cookbook collection. – Sandy

  6. Hi Sandy.

    Thank you so much for providing the list of the Canadian community cookbooks so quickly, and for providing so much detail about them. You have a very nice collection. I too own a copy of a few books from your list; one of my favourites is the Black Whale Cookbook. And I love Madame Benoit; another of my favourite cookbooks is her “Cooks at Home” book, which reads more like a book than a cookbook because she includes stories and provides lots of context for many of her recipes.

    I think I’m familiar with the used book store that you visited in Fort Erie. We’ve been there too, and I feel a need now to go shop there again, now that you’ve mentioned it. Thank you for that!

    And thank you too to Sue from the UK for her tip about another bookstore. I’ll be sure to stop in when I’m in the area.

    Oh, and I wanted to tell you about the Mad for Marmalade event that we attended in Toronto. My sister-in-law, husband and I had a great time. We attended the “marmalade roly-poly pudding” workshop during the event, where we enjoyed mixing together chopped beef kidney suet, flour, and some water; we then rolled it out, spread it with orange marmalade, and then rolled it back up. After wrapping and tying it up in a muslin tea towel, we threw it into a big, black, cast iron cauldron that was boiling on the hearth. It was great fun! Our citrus-themed lunch at the event included “orange-ginger beef stew” with long grained rice, “Morrocan carrot and orange salad”, “mixed green salad with orange dressing” and, for dessert, we had “pippin tarts” (i.e. an orange/apple pie made from a recipe found in a 1744 English cookbook, “Adam’s Luxury, and Eve’s Cookery”). After a few interesting lectures (“The Shirriff Saga”, a Canadian marmalade company that later evolved to produce other products and “How to Eat an Orange in the Victorian Manner”), announcements were made about the marmalade competition winners. By the sounds of it, Sandy, I think you would be a serious contender! This year, they had 4 competition categories,
    “pure Seville orange marmalade” (i.e. preserves made exclusively from Seville oranges),
    “citrus marmalade” (i.e. preserves made exclusively from other citrus fruit such as oranges, lemons, and grapefruit),
    “mock marmalade” (i.e. preserves made from citrus fruit(s) and/or a fruit or vegetable eg. carrot orange marmalade, pear lemon conserve, cranberry orange chutney), and lastly
    “baking with marmalade” (i.e. home-baked goods with marmalade as a major ingredient).
    The winners, of course, were quite pleased.
    This was my sister-in-law’s first time to the event and she really enjoyed it! I really enjoyed it too and am looking forward to going again.

    Well, it’s time for me to sign off. Thank you again for the Canadian cookbook list. I really enjoyed reading it. If you ever feel the need to clear some space off your shelves for other things/books, I would definitely be interested in buying them from you. ;) Alternatively, if you’re ever open to trading some books for others that I might have, please let me know.

    Take care, keep on bloggin’,
    Marie
    p.s. Your manuscript cookbook article was so interesting!

    • Dear Marie,
      Somehow I missed this comment when you posted it – usually I receive a notification in Verizon that someone has responded to a blog entry. I love, love, love your description of Mad for Marmalade – oh, how I would love to do that! I made a mock marmalade not very long ago, too–from a bag of asian pears that a neighbor gave to me. they were a little over the hill so I peeled and cored all of them in one fellswoop and then diced all the fruit. It was a little harder than other pears so I thought the answer was to cook them and I just started tossing in ingredients. I started with some honey and lime juice and just kept throwing in ingredientsp– it turned out just great but I’ll never have this recipe again. And I would be interested in selling or swapping some books sometime- I am trying to get another bookcase and figuring out where it can go because I need more shelf space. This house is about half the space we had living in Arleta so it is now wall to wall bookcases in all the bedrooms, living room and family room – then Bob, my significant other, built a library out of half of the garage in 2010. He passed away in 2011 so I am grateful for his creations. Hey, the woman in the bookstore–was she sort of sedentary and was there a cat on the premises? This woman was talking to someone about Scrabble games and I diligently steered clear of the conversation knowing if I got started we would have never made it to Ft Erie that day (I am an avid scrabble player…as are one of my sons and my older granddaughter). Thanks for writing back to me. I’ll look through the books and see if I have any doubles, for starters. rEgards, Sandy

  7. Hi Sandy.

    Sorry to hear about your significant other. Sounds like he helped you a lot with your hobbies, and I imagine, with everything else too.

    Your Asian pear marmalade sounds very tasty; I’m sure it would have won a prize at the Mad for Marmalade! :) Maybe you can try to re-create it and enter it in next year’s competition if you’ll be in Toronto.

    And regarding the sedentary woman at a bookstore, well, I believe the lady in the Fort Erie bookstore was fairly sedentary, but I do remember her getting up to look in the back room for some other items for me. There is, however, a VERY sedentary woman in a bookstore in St. Catharines (although I haven’t seen a cat there yet). I’ve been there many times and I’ve never seen her get out of her chair. Even when paying for books, you have to lean way over the counter to give her the money. The bookstore is called Hannelore Headley and I love it in there! Does that name ring a bell with you? The store is floor-to-ceiling books …many piles/boxes of books taking up most of the floor space. They’re actually having a 50%-off sale, as we speak, for the month of March, and I hope to shop there before the month is over!

    Lastly, thank you for considering to sell or trade some of your books. I started collecting old cookbooks after buying a 1950s copy of the Mennonite Community Cookbook by Mary Ellen Showalter at a library sale for $1. That book had a very strong effect on me, prompting me to start actively collecting more and more old cookbooks. This ‘collecting books’ is quite a curse, but I can’t seem to help it. I love it!! And I now have a mission in life to keep old cookbooks from ending up in a landfill. I’m going to make sure that my will takes care of my collection.

    Like you, however, space is an issue. So I’ve been forced to narrow my interest to just older Canadian books. I’ve managed to acquire many of the older ones you listed. There are really only two that I’ve never heard of and would love to find some day:

    CENTENNIAL COOKBOOK CHURCH OF CHRIST, FENWICK, ONTARIO, CIRCA 1946, spiral bound, photo of church on cover, larger than most cookbooks, more like 8½ x 11” in size. From Sharon’s mother.

    BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC LADIES CLUB, COOKBOK. 1948, soft cover, New Westminster, B.C. Booklet was compiled by the BC Electric’s Home Service Centre staffed by home economists.

    So once again, if you ever consider parting with them, please let me know. And thanks again for your blog and for all of your replies.

    -Marie

    • Hi, Marie – I will take a second look at the canadian cookbooks you listed…thank you again for writing, and for your interest. If this one neighbor (who is actually a friend’s sister) “donates” more pears this year from her tree, I am going to attempt copying the recipe & will write it down as I go along. I often make things up as I go along & then dont remember everything that went into the pot. A former coworker chastized me repeatedly for this & said “tape IT!” -this was back in the day of cassette tapes. So I did, several times, and I was just about rolling on the floor laughing at myself. I need to try and find those tapes sometime & see if Savannah can transfer THOSE to a CD. I was taping our making salsa one time and we were drinking wine at the same time & got quite looped.

      I dont expect to be in the Toronto area this year–possibly next year — and I am quite sure we didnt go to that used bookstore in St Catharines–I KNOW I would remember it. We only went to a new bookstore. which was fine! I bought some books here & began searching for Canadian authors after I read one or two books by Canadian authors…am also discovering Canadian singers–I dont mean the ones like Michael Buble who are so popular, but some others who arent as well known. (sorry not providing names right now – my hip is bothering me & I am trying to sit with a pillow keeping my back in place). I enjoy your messages–I hope you will stay in touch. – sandy

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